Government is the Problem

In his 1981 inaugural address to the nation, President Ronald Reagan said, “In this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problems, government is the problem.”  The words of Reagan have been confirmed.  Government regulations, corporate taxes, capital gains taxes, estates taxes, uncertainty regarding future tax policy, 40 precent overspending by the federal government, and a $15 trillion nation debt are now strangling us.  Adding to the misery is the ridiculous Congressional Deficit Reduction Super Committee: they came up with no plan, just as most of us forecast.

Meanwhile, Obama’s stimulus architect, Christina Romer, contends the problem is that the Federal Reserve has not been aggressive enough in their own stimulus efforts, and numerous commentators, led by Paul Krugman of the New York Times, say we need more unvarnished stimulus spending.  Again, what these leftist apparatchiks are demanding is more government.  They are basically saying, “This didn’t work before, so let’s just try more of it.”  There are reasons these foolish interventions haven’t worked.  The more government sucks out of the economy, the less there is left for private sector production.  The more uncertainty government produces, the less businesses are willing to hire, invest, and take risks.

It’s like dealing with an incompetent auto mechanic.  You just paid the guy $2,000 to fix your engine.  As soon as you drive off the lot you realize the problem has not been fixed, in fact it seems worse.  You do a quick U-turn, jump out  of the car and confront the mechanic.  He tells you, “For another  $2,000 I think we can get it fixed.”

Only a fool would go for that deal, which is what the Left is playing us for.

Our government is not stabilizing the economy, it’s creating instability.  We need less of it and not more.  Reagan was right: government is the problem.

Brian Sussman

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